Artists

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Carlos Garcia

From a contemporary perspective through abstract languages, close to Arte Povera and Materic Art, in which I combine tradition and innovation. As a versatile creator, my artistic work explores different methods (sculpture, painting, photography, installation, video).

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Abran Tracks

Born and raised in Taos, being around art was constant in Abran’s life. His early exposure shaped and molded his young mind, preparing him for the future artistic endeavors he would later take on in life.

Abran’s inspiration is derived from his First Nation culture and hiphop based influences.

One of his missions in life is to uplift, empower, connect, and build positive connections through the utilization of hiphop influenced art.

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Erin Currier

Part portraiture, part collage constructed of disinherited consumer "waste" collected in nearly fifty countries, part sociopolitical archive, but wholly humanist, Currier's work has been featured in numerous solo shows, including a major solo exhibition at the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela Embassy in Washington, DC.

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Sasha vom Dorp

Sasha Raphael vom Dorp has been exhibiting his work since 1992. A practice that began with painting in oils has evolved into creating kinetic sculpture, photography and interactive multimedia installations. His current work employs a bespoke machine that he’s create allowing him to see sound waves as they interact with sunlight and matter. His work has been featured on PBS and published in the NY Times.

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Tasha Ostrander

Rhythmic, melodic, and harmonious structures from the simplest materials and methods belie Tasha Ostrander’s process-oriented constructions in a multitude of mediums. Thematically, the work will always explore some aspect of where we stand in relation to Nature, as in our external natural world, and our inner nature, as in consciousness. The work reflects transformations of the inner self the and shimmering fractales of nature - special magnitude, if you will, an expansion of the spirit and body in several dimensions of space.

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Read Lockhart

YES! Oil paintings are about light. They are about composition and color, too. They are about subjects, and stories, and ideas. While any of these fascinations may be enough, I make oil paintings because I love oil paint. It is unlike any other medium; its properties are enticing, and it shares the appealing properties of the food we desire. When used properly it is a sauce, a butter, a cream, an icing, a powder, or a dry piece of bread – oil and dirt become so bewitching they can make us hungry. My paintings aim to become nourishment for your mind.

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Izumi Yokoyama

Izumi Yokoyama is a Japanese artist living in Taos, New Mexico. She earned an MFA from San Francisco Art Institute in 2009. Her intricate pen and ink drawings and installations represent significant and transformative phases in life. Yokoyama has been showing her work in Japan and the United States for over a decade. She is also an art instructor and a mother of two children.

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Larry Bell

Larry Bell is one of the most noteworthy representatives of abstract art in the postwar period. His career has spanned four decades and has given him an audience in all of the major art centers of the world. His medium, “light on surface,” has often utilized the technology of thin deposition of vaporized metal films. Bell’s work has evolved in a number of directions beginning with constructions, glass boxes, and standing wall glass panel sculptures.

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J Matthew Thomas

In my current body of artwork, I explore the “gray zone” between the chaos and order of everyday life, seeking order by creating geometrical patterns from the material debris of life’s habitual encounters. My process is additive and subtractive, not unlike the practice of architecture and construction. I make paintings by layering various kinds of discarded paper - newspapers, magazine subscriptions, food cartons, bills, envelopes, on wood panels and sanding through the layers to reveal a range of colors, textures, and text.

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Zoe Zimmerman

The stories that make up my life are distracting. Too many words. The visual work I produce is an attempt to relinquish the relentlessly novelesque nature of this particular life to the forgiving ambiguity of poetry. I tell a story by letting go of the storyline and focusing on one moment of understanding or revelation, reducing my verbose inclinations to one or two words.